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bruce jenner's decathlon cheats
 

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Bruce Jenner's Decathlon cheats

bruce jenner's decathlon cheats

SPECIAL TIPS

Easter Egg:
Pressing the keys K,N, A & P simultaneously will produce an amusing sound.


Selecting Athlete Difficulty Levels:


When Building the Athletes you have a choice as to what skill level each athlete should be at: Rookie, Average or Veteran. This choice affects the points you get for clicking at the right Twitch Points when competing in the decathlon, for example, the discus release point or the long jump point. A rookie missing a twitch point by "x" amount will get a better score than a veteran who also misses it by the same amount. However, a veteran will score higher than a rookie if he or she hits the twitch points right on.


If you have really good reflexes start off with veteran. Otherwise, play it by ear and start off with rookie. Also, make sure you know where all the twitch points are in all the events by checking out Competing in Each Event.


Choosing Glide or Rotation for the Shot Put:


There are two methods used for the Shot Put, the glide and the rotation methods. The glide consists of a linear movement across the ring. The rotation involves a one turn rotation along a straight line. You can choose which method your athletes use by selecting the appropriate radio button in the Create Decathlon Athlete dialog box (see Building the Athletes). Each method is equally useful, though, so it shouldn't make any difference to your overall performance.


Allocating Skill Points:


As explained in Building the Athletes you can custom create both your own athlete and those you are competing against. To do so you enter a locker and click on the Create button, bringing up the Create Decathlon Athlete dialog box. You have a certain number of Skill Points available to you, which you can use up by increasing either of your Sprinting, Middle Distance, Weight Throwing, Jumping and Coordination Skills. In general Sprinting will help you in the 100 Meter Dash and the 110 Meter Hurdles, Middle Distance in the 400 Meter and 1500 Meter Races, Weight Throwing in the Shot Put, Discus and Javelin, Jumping in the Long Jump, High Jump and Pole Vault, and Coordination will help you in every event. All events, however, require some combination of different skills. For example, the 110 Meter Hurdles will also require some jumping skills and coordination as well as sprinting skills.


Skill points that you do not allocate to specific skill categories such as Sprinting and Middle Distance are made available to your athlete as endurance points, as shown in the endurance points window. So you shouldn't necessarily allocate all of your skill points to specific categories if you want your athlete to have enough endurance to complete the decathlon (see Monitoring Your Endurance). Your maximum endurance level is 100 points, if you don't allocate any skill points at all to specific categories. You may want to start off your athlete with 50 endurance points or so, and then experiment to see what happens.


Training Your Athlete:


You can only train an athlete in the Season Mode. This mode is selected by using the Game Season Mode menu command, which requires you to choose how many decathlons comprise a season, ranging from three to ten. The more decathlons you have in the season, the more opportunity you have to train your athlete and improve his skills and endurance.


At the end of every decathlon in the season, athletes will earn additional skill points, depending upon their performance. If you do nothing, these skill points will only enhance the athlete's endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance). You do, however, have the option of adding some or all of these additional skill points to any athlete's skill categories of Sprinting, Middle Distance, Weight Throwing, Jumping and Coordination Skills. You can do this by re-entering the locker room, opening an athlete's locker, and pressing the Train button (see Allocating Skill Points). Note that you can only add to the athlete's skill categories, you cannot reduce the points already allocated to a skill category. You can also only train a human controlled athlete: a computer controlled athlete will be trained by the computer.


There are two important questions to be considered in this training of an athlete. Firstly, what portion of these additional skill points should be allocated to individual skill categories and what should be left on the table as additional endurance for the athlete. Secondly, how should the portion allocated to individual skill categories be distributed between the different skill categories. To make these decisions you should take a look at Reviewing Athlete Performance.


If you or any of your friends are successful in training an excellent athlete you should consider Trading Athlete Files with Other Players.


Trading Athlete Files with Other Players:


As explained in Building the Athletes you can save the athletes you have custom created by clicking on the Save button in the lockers. You can swap these files with other players to see what impact that has on your performance. Bear in mind that in the Game Season Mode (see Choosing the Practice, Single Decathlon or Season Modes) your athlete will have additional skill points made available to it in its locker after the successful completion of each decathlon in the season (see Playing a Season of Decathlons). After multiple decathlon seasons you will have an athlete you can be proud of and want to share with your friends.


Reviewing Athlete Performance:


The key to success in the Game Season mode (see Choosing the Practice, Single Decathlon, or Season Modes) lies in custom creating and training over a number of decathlons an outstanding athlete. To achieve this you need to regularly review your athlete's performance to see how it could be improved.


The first area to look at is your athlete's endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance). Endurance is what gives your athlete the extra speed, stamina and strength to do better in each event. It does replenish itself at the end of the first day of the decathlon, ready for the second day, but you could still be running out of it towards the end of either of the two days of a Decathlon competition. Perhaps you don't have enough of it in the first place, or perhaps you're burning up too much of it in the early events. You can give yourself more endurance by allocating less skill points to individual skill categories (see Building the Athletes). Or you can burn up less endurance by, say, accelerating less in the early events such as the 100 Meter Dash on the first day or the 110 Meter Hurdles on the second day.


The second area to look at is how your athlete is doing against its opponents in the Game Season mode (see Choosing the Practice, Single Decathlon, or Season Modes). You can do so by looking at the Athlete Information window accessible via the View Athletes menu command. This window shows you the skill values for all of the competing athletes and allows you to view the personal records for each athlete by clicking the relevant Details button. By comparing the personal records to the skill values for each athlete you may learn some valuable insights about creating better athletes for yourself.


The third area to look at is the bonus skill points that your athlete earns in the Game Season mode for completing each individual decathlon (see Playing a Season of Decathlons). Depending upon the results of your analyses in the first and second areas you may want to either let these bonus skill points pump up your endurance level, or enter your locker room to allocate these points to specific skill categories (see Building the Athletes), or some combination of the two.


Tips on the 100 Meter Dash:


Build an athlete with excellent sprinting skills (see Allocating Skill Points). But remember that the trade-off could be weaker performance in other events.


Build or develop an athlete with excellent endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance) so that you can hold down your left mouse button for longer and accelerate further into the race. But remember that tough 400 Meter Race later on today and the endurance that will require.


If you have an athlete with weaker sprinting skills than its competitors (see Reviewing Athlete Performance), you may want to conserve your endurance for other events you are better at.


Try and anticipate the starting gun to get off to a fast start. Remember, though, that after three false starts you will be disqualified.


Hold down the left mouse button long enough to accelerate ahead of the pack and then release it.


Remember to click your right mouse button at the finish to lean your athlete's body towards the tape and gain a little extra time.


Tips on the Long Jump:


Build an athlete with excellent jumping skills (see Allocating Skill Points). But remember that the trade-off could be weaker performance in other events.


Give your athlete a longer run-up to the take-off line by dragging and dropping him further away from it. You'll burn up more endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance) but, potentially, you could jump farther.


If you have an athlete with weaker jumping skills than its competitor (see Reviewing Athlete Performance), you may want to conserve your endurance for other events you are better at.


Try and jump as close to the take-off line as possible.


Play it safe initially by getting one good jump in at the lowest endurance level to get some points up on the scoreboard. Jump early before the take-off line to avoid any possibility of fouling. Then, if you're good at the event, consider allocating more endurance to subsequent jumps and jumping closer to the take-off line.


Remember to click your left mouse button on landing after jumping to throw your athlete's balance forward and stop him from falling backwards.


Tips on the Shot Put:


Build an athlete with excellent weight throwing skills (see Allocating Skill Points). But remember that the trade-off could be weaker performance in other events.


Give your athlete a longer run-up to the stopboard by dragging and dropping him further away from it. You'll burn up more endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance) but, potentially, you could throw farther.


If you have an athlete with weaker weight throwing skills than its competitors (see Reviewing Athlete Performance), you may want to conserve your endurance for other events that you are better at.


Try and throw as close to the stopboard as possible.


Play it safe initially by getting one good throw in at the lowest endurance level to get some points up on the scoreboard. Throw early before the stopboard to avoid any possibility of fouling. Then, if you're good at the event, consider allocating more endurance to the two subsequent throws and throwing closer to the stopboard.


Tips on the High Jump:


Build an athlete with excellent jumping skills (see Allocating Skill Points). But remember that the trade-off could be weaker performance in other events.


Give your athlete a longer run-up to the jump-off point by dragging and dropping him further away from it. You'll burn up more endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance) but, potentially, you could jump higher.


If you have an athlete with weaker jumping skills than its competitors (see Reviewing Athlete Performance), you may want to conserve your endurance for the next event, the 400 Meter Race.


Try and jump as close to the jump-off point line as possible.


Remember also to click again on the left mouse button to lift your athlete's legs over the bar.


Try and rack up some points early on by jumping over an easy height with the lowest endurance level to rack up some scorepoints on the scoreboard. Then try a higher height you think you can make at the lowest endurance level. If you have trouble, try more endurance.


Think about limiting the number of jumps you do, as each jump costs you some endurance that you may need in the next event, the 400 Meter Race. You may want to consider using the menu item Retire from Event if you feel your previous best jump is adaquate.


Remember, once you have fouled three times you are out of the event, as you don't have the opportunity to fall back to an easier height.


Tips on the 400 Meter Race:


Build an athlete with excellent middle distance skills (see Allocating Skill Points). But remember that the trade-off could be weaker performance in other events.


Build or develop an athlete with excellent endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance) so that you can accelerate and maintain your speed for longer by tapping on your left mouse button.


Remember that the 400 Meters is the last event of the first day of the decathlon. You can burn up all of your endurance as it will be refreshed to its original starting value tomorrow morning. Study the use of your Stride Meter to see how you can achieve this.


If your athlete has excellent middle distance skills, think about conserving more of your endurance in the four earlier events for this race.


Make sure you don't run out of endurance before the end of the race, otherwise your performance will collapse.


Tips on the 110 Meter Hurdles:


Build an athlete with excellent sprinting and jumping skills (see Allocating Skill Points). But remember that the trade-off could be weaker performance in other events.


Build or develop an athlete with excellent endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance) so that you can hold down your left mouse button for longer and accelerate farther into the race. But remember that tough 1500 Meter Race later on today and the endurance that will need.


If you have an athlete with weaker sprinting and jumping skills than its competitors (see Reviewing Athlete Performance), you may want to conserve your endurance for the four last events of the Decathlon.


Try and anticipate the starting gun to get off to a fast start. Remember, though, that after three false starts you will be disqualified.


Hold down the left mouse button long enough to accelerate ahead of the pack and then release it.


Remember to click on your right mouse button to jump the hurdles. The performance penalty for attempting to jump a hurdle and knocking it over is less than that for just running through the hurdle.


Remember to click on your right mouse button at the finish to lean your athlete's body towards the tape and thereby gain a little extra time.


Tips on the Discus:


Build an athlete with excellent weight throwing skills (see Allocating Skill Points). But remember that the trade-off could be weaker performance in other events.


Give your athlete a longer run-up to the discus circle by dragging and dropping him further away from it. You'll burn up more endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance) but, potentially, you could throw farther.


If you have an athlete with weaker weight throwing skills than its competitors (see Reviewing Athlete Performance), you may want to conserve your endurance for the last three events of the decathlon.


Try and throw as close to the discus circle as possible. But remember, after three fouls you'll be disqualified.


Play it safe initially by getting one good throw in at the lowest endurance level to get some points up on the scoreboard. Throw early before the discus circle to avoid any possibility of fouling. Then, if you're good at the event, consider allocating more endurance to the two subsequent throws and throwing closer to the stopboard.


Tips on the Pole Vault:


Build an athlete with excellent jumping skills (see Allocating Skill Points). But remember that the trade-off could be weaker performance in other events.


Give your athlete a longer run-up to the take-off point by dragging and dropping him further away from it. You'll burn up more endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance) but, potentially, you could vault higher.


If you have an athlete with weaker jumping skills than its competitors (see Reviewing Athlete Performance), you may want to conserve your endurance for the final two events of the Decathlon, the Javelin and the 1500 Meter Race.


Try and vault as close to the take-off point line as possible.


Remember also to click again on the left mouse button to lift your athlete's legs over the cross bar.


Try and rack up some points early on by vaulting over an easy height with the lowest endurance level to rack up some scorepoints on the scoreboard. Then try a higher height you think you can make at the lowest endurance level. If you have trouble, try more endurance.


Think about limiting the number of vaults you do, as each vault costs you some endurance that you may need in the next two events. You may want to consider using the menu item Retire from Event if you feel your previous best jump is adaquate.


Remember, once you have missed three times at the same height you are out of the event, as you don't have the opportunity to fall back to an easier height.


Tips on the Javelin:


Build an athlete with excellent weight throwing skills (see Allocating Skill Points). But remember that the trade-off could be weaker performance in other events.


Give your athlete a longer run-up to the foul line by dragging and dropping him further away from it. You'll burn up more endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance) but, potentially, you could throw farther.


If you have an athlete with weaker weight throwing skills than its competitors (see Reviewing Athlete Performance), you may want to conserve your endurance for the grueling final event of the Decathlon, the 1500 Meter Race.


Try and throw as close to the foul line as possible. But remember, after three fouls you'll be disqualified.


Note that you have to click on the left mouse button to throw the javelin before you see the foul line. A shaded area on the run-up lane indicates the throwing zone and will give early warning of the approaching foul line.


Play it safe initially by getting one good throw in at the lowest endurance level to get some points up on the scoreboard. Throw early before the foul line to avoid any possibility of fouling. Then, if you're good at the event, consider allocating more endurance to the two subsequent throws and throwing closer to the foul line.


Tips on the 1500 Meter Race:


Build an athlete with excellent middle distance skills (see Allocating Skill Points). But remember that the trade-off could be weaker performance in other events.


Build or develop an athlete with excellent endurance (see Monitoring Your Endurance) so that you can accelerate and maintain your speed for longer by tapping on your left mouse button.


Remember that the 1500 Meters is the last event of the decathlon and your last opportunity to rack up points. You can therefore burn up all of your endurance. Study the use of your Stride Meter to see how you can achieve this.


If your athlete has excellent middle distance skills, think about conserving more of your endurance in the four earlier events for this race.


Make sure you don't run out of endurance before the end of the race, otherwise your performance will collapse.


Don't forget to use your right mouse button to change lanes and pass athletes in front of you after you have rounded the first bend.


Listen for the bell indicating you have one lap remaining to run ( Bell Lap ).


Occasionally look at the decreasing distance number on the status bar to see how much distance you have remaining to run. This could be very useful in pacing yourself.

 

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